Community Med Center

​​Vaccination

Influenza (Flu)

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. The “seasonal flu season” in the United States can begin as early as October and last as late as May. During this time, flu viruses are circulating in the population. 
An annual seasonal flu vaccine (either the flu shot or the nasal-spray flu vaccine) is the best way to reduce the chances that you will get seasonal flu and spread it to others. When more people get vaccinated against the flu, less flu can spread through that community.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Flu Vaccine 

Varicella (Chicken Pox)

Chickenpox vaccine protects you against a very uncomfortable and sometimes serious disease. Chickenpox used to be very common in the United States, but thankfully, the Chickenpox vaccine has changed that. 
​CDC recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine for children, adolescents, and adults.
Children should receive two doses of the vaccine—the first dose at 12 through 15 months old and a second dose at 4 through 6 years old. Two doses of the vaccine are about 98% effective at preventing chickenpox. 
Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Learn more about the Chicken Pox Vaccine

Hepatitis A 

Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in the stool of people with hepatitis A.It is usually spread by close personal contact and sometimes by eating food or drinking water containing HAV. A person who has hepatitis A can easily pass the disease to others within the same household. Hepatitis A can cause,“flu-like” illness, jaundice (yellow skin or eyes, dark urine), severe stomach pains and diarrhea (children). People with hepatitis A often have to be hospitalized (up to about 1 person in 5). Adults with hepatitis A are often too ill to work for up to a month. Sometimes, people die as a result of hepatitis A (about 3–6 deaths per 1,000 cases).
Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A.
Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis B virus is easily spread through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person. People can also be infected from contact with a contaminated object, where the virus can live for up to 7 days. 
Hepatitis B vaccine can prevent hepatitis B, and the serious consequences of hepatitis B infection, including liver cancer and cirrhosis

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Hepatitis B Vaccine 

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. More than half of sexually active men and women are infected with HPV at some time in their lives. About 20 million Americans are currently infected, and about 6 million more get infected each year. HPV is usually spread through sexual contact.Most HPV infections don’t cause any symptoms, and go away on their own. But HPV can cause cervical cancer in women. Cervical cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths among women around the world. In the United States, about 10,000 women get cervical cancer every year and about 4,000 are expected to die from it. HPV is also associated with several less common cancers, such as vaginal and vulvar cancers in women and other types of cancer in both men and women. It can also cause genital warts and warts in the throat. 
HPV vaccine is recommended for girls 11 or 12 years of age. It may be given to girls starting at age 9. It is important for girls to get HPV vaccine before their first    sexual contact—because they won’t have been exposed to human papillomavirus. Once a girl or woman has been infected with the virus, the vaccine might not work as well or might not work at all.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the HPV Vaccine 

Meningococcal Disease 

Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial illness. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children 2 through 18 years old in the United States. Meningitis is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningococcal disease also causes blood infections.Children with certain medical conditions, such as lack of a spleen, have an increased risk of getting meningococcal disease. College freshmen living in dorms are also at increased risk. 
There are two kinds of meningococcal vaccine in the U.S. Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) is the preferred vaccine for people 55 years of age and younger. Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4) has been available since the 1970s. It is the only meningococcal vaccine licensed for people older than 55.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Meningococcal Vaccine 

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) 

Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases. Before vaccines they were very common, especially among children.  These diseases spread from person to person through the air. You can easily catch them by being around someone who is already infected.
Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine can protect children (and adults) from all three of these diseases. Thanks to successful vaccination programs these diseases are much less common in the U.S. than they used to be. But if we stopped vaccinating they would return.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the MMR Vaccine 

Shingles 

Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters. It is also called Herpes Zoster, or just Zoster. A shingles rash usually appears on one side of the face or body and lasts from 2 to 4 weeks. Its main symptom is pain, which can be quite severe. Other symptoms of shingles can include fever, headache, chills and upset stomach. Very rarely, a shingles infection can lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, brain inflammation (encephalitis) or death. Shingles is caused by the Varicella Zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox.Only someone who has had chickenpox—or, rarely, has gotten chickenpox vaccine—can get shingles. The virus stays in your body, and can cause shingles many years later
A vaccine for shingles was licensed in 2006. In clinical trials, the vaccine reduced the risk of shingles by 50%. It can also reduce pain in people who still get shingles after being vaccinated.A single dose of shingles vaccine is recommended for adults 60 years of age and older.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Shingles Vaccine 

Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Td/Tdap)

Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis can be very serious diseases. These three diseases are all caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person. Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.The United States saw as many as 200,000 cases a year of diphtheria and pertussis before vaccines were available, and hundreds of cases of tetanus. Since then, tetanus and diphtheria cases have dropped by about 99% and pertussis cases by about 92%.
Children 6 years of age and younger get DTaP vaccine to protect them from these three diseases. But older children, adolescents, and adults need protection too. Two vaccines are available to protect people 7 years of age and older from these diseases. Td vaccine has been used for many years. It protects against tetanus and diphtheria. Tdap vaccine was licensed in 2005. It is the first vaccine for adolescents and adults that protects against pertussis as well as tetanus and diphtheria. A Td booster dose is recommended every 10 years. Tdap is given only once.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Td/Tdap Vaccine ​​

Typhoid 

Typhoid (typhoid fever) is a serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, stomach pains, headache, loss of appetite, and sometimes a rash. If it is not treated, it can kill up to 30% of people who get it.Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others.Generally, people get typhoid from contaminated food or water. Typhoid is rare in the U.S., and most U.S. citizens who get the disease get it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000.
Typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid.There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine gotten as a shot. The other is a live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine which is taken orally (by mouth).

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Typhoid Vaccine ​​

Pneumococcal Disease

Pneumococcal disease is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. It is a leading cause of vaccine- preventable illness and death in the United States. Anyone can get pneumococcal disease, but some people are at greater risk than others, people 65 years and older, the very young, people with certain health problems, people with a weakened immune system, and smokers.
Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, including those most likely to cause serious disease.Most healthy adults who get the vaccine develop protection to most or all of these types within 2 to 3 weeks of getting the shot. Very old people, children under 2 years of age, and people with some long-term illnesses might not respond as well, or at all.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Learn more about the Pneumococcal Vaccine ​​